Siddhivinayak temple (2023) – Mumbai City | Timing, History

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Siddhivinayak Temple

Sri Siddhivinayak Ganpati temple is a popular Hindu temple in the Indian state of Maharashtra. It is situated in Prabhadevi place, and Lord Ganesha is worshipped more in Maharashtra. Therefore, the Ganesh Chaturthi festival is considered the greatest festival in Maharashtra. Lakshmana Vithu and Deubai Patil constructed the temple on 19th November 1801. The couple had no children, so they built the Sidhivinayak temple. To fulfil the wishes of other infertile women. The name of the temple comes from the richest temple in Maharashtra. 

This temple’s architecture is a picturesque location, and one could fall in love with the place. Lord Ganesha statue’s specialty is that he has a lotus in his upper right hand and a curb in his left hand. And the garland of beads in the bottom right and a bowl of modak (laddu) in his left hand. Both his wives, Siddhi and Riddhi, are on either side of Ganesha, signifying success, wealth, and fulfilment of all desires. The temple is mostly visited by devotees on Tuesdays and fulfils their aspirations. Every year the Ganpati Puja Festival is celebrated here from the Chaturthi of Bhadrapad to Anant Chaturdashi.

How to reach Siddhivinayak temple

You can take buses from any part of the city to reach Dadar/ Prabhadevi. Also, you can take the local train (Central, Western, Harbour) to reach Dadar. Apart from this, cab services are also available to reach the place. You can also hail cabs from the nay point of the city. 

History of Sidhivinayak temple

The factuality of the temple’s construction is that of faith and belief in god. Lakshmana Vithu and Deubai Patil constructed the temple on 19th November 1801. The couple decided to build the temple because they didn’t have a child, and the temple was dedicated to Lord Ganesha. So, Lord Ganesh fulfilled all wishes of childless couples and blessed them with a child. The temple’s original structure is a square tower adorned with a dome with a shaped spire. 

Ganesh Chaturthi

 People celebrate this festival by preparing the artistic clay model of Ganesh Ji, eco-friendly idols, and many more. The size of these idols varies from inches to feet. So, it starts with installing these Ganesh statues colourfully in homes and pandals in many localities.

And these pandals are decorated using lights, flower garlands, etc. Some pandals are theme-based, depicting religious themes, events related to Lord Ganesha, or sometimes current events. The festival ends with Ganesha visarjana, during which these installed statues of Lord Ganesha are immersed into the water bodies, sea, and river. The festival is prominently celebrated in India’s western part in Maharashtra and Gujarat, Apart from southern India and worldwide.

The foremost temples which are must be visited in Mumbai, Maharashtra.

Sri Sri Radha Gopinath temple

This temple was originally built to serve as an orphanage. However, it was bought over by the ISKON foundation and was converted into a beautiful temple. In 1988 the temple was established, opening its doors to devotees in 1990. Apart from this, the temple’s factuality is that it is also home to many animals like cows, peacocks, and monkeys. So, the temple provides a safe environment for them. The temple offers you a majestic structure and various paintings depicting the entire Krishna and Radha Saga. 

Walkeshwar temple

In Mumbai, this temple holds a historical and unique culture that signifies the place. According to the legends, Lord Rama made a shivling from sand for his Pooja. A thousand years ago, the temple was built by Shilahara Dynasty on the Malabar Hills.

Walkeshwar is derived from Valuka Ishwar, which means Lord of the Sand. Once in the 1950s, the temple was renovated twice in the seventeenth century. The temple also plays hosts several Hindustani Classical music festivals.

Mumbadevi Temple

oldest temples in the city. Mumbai city derives its name from the Mumbadevi temple. This temple is unique in that it is dedicated to the goddess Mumba, who is the patron goddess of the native Somavanshi Kshatriyas. As it is the agricultural communities and the Kolis (fishermen). The idol in the temple is made of black sandstone, and the face is painted orange. Also, it is decorated with jewellery like nose pins, crowns, necklaces, and many more. Apart from this, the temple is the house of other deities. Numerous devotees gather in large numbers on Tuesdays as it is an auspicious day. 

Best time to visit Siddhivinayak temple

Tourists can visit Sidhivinayk temple between October to March as the weather remains pleasant during this time. Every Tuesday, numerous devotees visit the temple as it is considered the ideal worship day. Also, you might want to visit the temple during festivals like Vinayaka Chaturthi, Bhadrapad Shree Ganesh Chaturthi, and many more, which have special prayer services. To learn more about the place, you must visit at least once. So you can feel the majestic vibe of the site and worship in front of Lord Ganesha. 

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Vinayaka Chaturthi

The festival of Vinayaka Chaturthi is celebrated to honour the Hindu god Ganesh. This festival, well known as Vinayaka Chaturthi, The Siddhivinayak Temple, has a rich history of rituals and festivals. The temple celebrates several festivals yearly, but the most important one is Ganesh Chaturthi. During this festival, which usually falls in August or September, the temple is decorated with flowers and lights, and the idol of Lord Ganesha is worshipped with great devotion and enthusiasm. People celebrate this festival by preparing the artistic clay model of Ganesh Ji, eco-friendly idols, and many more. The size of these idols varies from inches to feet. So, it starts with installing these Ganesh statues colourfully in homes and pandals in many localities. And these pandals are decorated using lights, flower garlands, etc. Some pandals are theme-based, depicting religious themes, events related to Lord Ganesha, or sometimes current events.

Lord Ganesha temple

Sri Siddhivinayak Ganpati temple is a popular Hindu temple in the Indian state of Maharashtra. It is situated in Prabhadevi place, and Lord Ganesha is worshipped more in Maharashtra. Therefore, the Ganesh Chaturthi festival is considered the greatest festival in Maharashtra. Lakshmana Vithu and Deubai Patil constructed the temple on 19th November 1801. The couple had no children, so they built the Sidhivinayak temple. To fulfil the wishes of other infertile women. The name of the temple comes from the richest temple in Maharashtra. 

Walkeshwar Temple

In Mumbai, this temple holds a historical and unique culture that signifies the place. According to the legends, Lord Rama made a shivling from sand for his Pooja. A thousand years ago, the temple was built by Shilahara Dynasty on the Malabar Hills. Walkeshwar is derived from Valuka Ishwar, which means Lord of the Sand. Once in the 1950s, the temple was renovated twice in the seventeenth century. The temple also plays hosts several Hindustani Classical music festivals. 

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